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  • #1019068
    JohnSheppard
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    John Debrincat, post: 22952 wrote:
    Lets just watch that space, Oracle has made no promises.

    MySQL is open source, its a non-issue that oracle own it. If it turns bad people will move to the several forks which have already occured, one of which is headed by the guy who was in charge prior to it being purchased by SUN.

    Regardless, DB system choice is also a non issue for DIY’ers…most all the open source stuff uses MySQL and if they’re going with proprietry systems it’s been chosen for them 99% of the time.

    #1019069
    John Debrincat
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    john.sheppard, post: 22960 wrote:
    MySQL is open source, its a non-issue that oracle own it.
    Sure….

    USA Antitrust worried about Oracle/SUN/MySQL

    http://www.dbms2.com/2009/09/10/what-could-or-should-make-oraclemysql-antitrust-concerns-go-away/

    European commission object to Oracle/SUN/MySQL

    http://www.sitepoint.com/blogs/2009/11/11/eu-object-oracle-sun-mysql-takeover/#

    “Save MySQL from Oracle’ Petition Delivered to 3 Antitrust Regulators” http://xml.sys-con.com/node/1220384

    Anyway as you say nothing to do with online shop decisions but interesting none the less.

    John

    #1019070
    Brad
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    • Total posts: 7
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    Wow, there sure is a lot of Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt being spread around this thread.

    I’ll ignore the comments on databases, DB performance, Open Source etc as I don’t think anyone necessarily cares, from the perspective of ‘small business owner who wants to achieve X, Y and Z’. I care to a degree, but that’s down to my field of expertise :)

    The #1 (and arguably only. IMO and YMMV – see below) advantage of going with a pre-made shopfront (sort of SaaS for e-commerce if you will) is ease of implementation and ease of use for the business owner.

    The vast majority of my career professional experience is as a Systems Administrator. Various flavours of Windows, Unix and Linux and even MacOS. Myriad types of applications from DB servers (mysql/postgres/ingres) through Web servers (open source and Microsoft), national DNS infrastructure and yes even email from border SMTP through client-facing email/calendar boxes. Much of my experience has been with Open Source technologies. I’m not a zealot either way, but I like Open Source and will generally consider an OSI license a benefit to any given application. Naturally the application must work correctly and do the things we want it to do, regardless of license type.

    I know email systems. I’ve run them for years, across organisations from <20 people to > 7000. I’ve dealt with spam, viruses, missing email and misbehaving clients. I’ve configured most of the popular SMTP email servers, and most of the popular ‘enterprise’ solutions (those that include calendaring etc, e.g. Microsoft Exchange).

    With all that said, when it came time to configure email for my new venture it took me all of ten seconds to decide on Google Apps Premier.

    I want to focus on my business. I don’t want to focus on maintaining a server or on configuring Postfix or on broken anti-spam programs misclassifying email.

    THIS is the advantage of SaaS, and of packaged solutions such as what John is talking about.

    The biggest disadvantage (that I can see at least) is control and flexibility. Packaged solutions are just that – packaged. You can get some customisation (sometimes – depends on product and vendor) but it will cost you extra. You also need to be careful of lock-in.

    You can go fully hosted (SaaS), or paid COTS package on your own server, or free COTS on your own server, or custom on your own server. Any of these options, you can replace ‘on your own server’ with a totally hosted solution (Virtual Private Server inc management) in which you don’t have to worry about care and feeding of the server, unless you want to.

    Basically what it comes down to is the more flexibility and control you want, the more money it will cost OR the more effort it will require on your part to install/maintain. Kind of like ‘fast, cheap, good – pick any two’.

    #1019071
    Brad
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    Addendum.

    Went looking for example sites using Commbank’s Evolve iShop service and found this:

    [url]https://shortsandshirts.evolveshop.c…tsandshirts.sf[/url]

    Now, no disrespect intended for the person who’s running that business but… mein eyes, they bleed!

    A perfect example of why my Website, when I get to it (*bing bing bing* great example of a disadvantage to custom – harder/longer process than packaged and therefore sloooower to get done. Of course, I’m working full time as an IT contractor and new to the whole ‘run your own PTY LTD’ thing to boot, so maybe it’s just me), will be:

    1. Professionally designed
    2. Coded to a detailed spec, with guidance from a professional web dev shop.
    3. Preferably using Open Source Software as a base, with COTS components as required.

    Now if it takes me six months to get there, that’s six months I could have been selling with a packaged site. Ultimately though, it’s my image and reputation I’m risking not just my $, hence I’ll take the time+cost trade-off.

    #1019072
    OllyEllice
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    Hi Brad,

    I run the site below that is giving your eyes such a hard time ( https://shortsandshirts.evolveshop.com.au/ ) . I’d like some feedback on what exactly you feel are the main issues with it so I can make attempts to improve. We’ve only opened 1st December and to be honest web development isn’t my strong point and this is an ongoing learning process for me. So Any constructive critisism would be great.

    Thanks

    Olly.

    brad, post: 24277 wrote:
    Addendum.

    Went looking for example sites using Commbank’s Evolve iShop service and found this:

    [url]https://shortsandshirts.evolveshop.c…tsandshirts.sf[/url]

    Now, no disrespect intended for the person who’s running that business but… mein eyes, they bleed!

    A perfect example of why my Website, when I get to it (*bing bing bing* great example of a disadvantage to custom – harder/longer process than packaged and therefore sloooower to get done. Of course, I’m working full time as an IT contractor and new to the whole ‘run your own PTY LTD’ thing to boot, so maybe it’s just me), will be:

    1. Professionally designed
    2. Coded to a detailed spec, with guidance from a professional web dev shop.
    3. Preferably using Open Source Software as a base, with COTS components as required.

    Now if it takes me six months to get there, that’s six months I could have been selling with a packaged site. Ultimately though, it’s my image and reputation I’m risking not just my $, hence I’ll take the time+cost trade-off.

    #1019073
    Adam Randall
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    Do you think Leyton Hewitt plays with a $20 tennis racquet from K-mart?
    No I dont think so either, probably because he knows what benefits a $600 racquet provide over the $20 racquet.

    While not many of us are at such an elite level at sport that we need the edge a tennis racquet of that quality can provide, we all want our business to be the best it can be.

    My point here is that we don’t know what we don’t know.

    I think in 5 or 10 years time, the instant web sites will be dialed in and as good as a real one. The tools even now are getting pretty good at compensating for lack of technical ability.

    Recommending solutions such as word press is all well and good, but if its the only thing you have ever used or have never had a real web site for at least a couple of years, how can that be classed as a recommendation?

    You current solution may be OK and you may not know enough to see its weaknesses, it does not mean it is a good solution.

    What I have learnt in life so far is that the less you are prepared to pay for something, the less you actually know about it.

    Knowledgable cyclists use mid to high end bikes
    Knowledgable business people use mid to high end business tools
    Knowledgable stylists use mid to high end scissors
    Knowledgable tradesmen use mid to high end power tools

    See the pattern here?

    when you dont know anything about a given subject, the only thing left to relate to is price which is often why people who are not knowledgable on a certain subject will gravitate to the cheapest price, its the only thing that can be reconciled.

    Next time you think about getting the cheapest solution for something, think:

    – Is it my lack of knowledge that makes me gravitate to the cheapest?

    #1019074
    Brad
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    • Total posts: 7
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    Hi Olly,

    OllyEllice, post: 24961 wrote:
    Hi Brad,

    I run the site below that is giving your eyes such a hard time ( https://shortsandshirts.evolveshop.com.au/ ) . I’d like some feedback on what exactly you feel are the main issues with it so I can make attempts to improve. We’ve only opened 1st December and to be honest web development isn’t my strong point and this is an ongoing learning process for me. So Any constructive critisism would be great.

    Thanks

    Olly.

    Small world :)

    First of all, please accept my apologies if my post up-thread came across as unduly harsh or offensive. Such was not my intent. I was attempting to convey a point and be a touch humorous at the same time. Upon reflection however, it is clear to me I should have considered my wording more carefully.

    I’m not a web designer, my background is systems. The best (best attempt at constructive that is) advice I can give would be to speak with a Web Design company. Web Design and Web Programming are two separate areas of expertise. In my experience there are many web coders who don’t know the design/User Interface side.

    Try this for an interesting exercise. Go to http://www.bikebiz.com.au and have a browse around. Now put ‘bikebiz.com.au’ into Archive.org’s Wayback machine (http://www.archive.org), pick the newest archived page and browse around.

    The old design for bikebiz was fairly user unfriendly. The frontpage links would popup new windows. To get to certain areas, you had to go through other areas first (I seem to recall you couldn’t get to ‘Shop’ without going via the ‘Bikes’ pages). Archive.org doesn’t cache their old site very well once beyond the front page, perhaps because of how the old site was designed.

    Basically, bikebiz’s old site was annoying to use. I’d rather use mcas.com.au (one of their competitors) to look at motorcycle gear, solely because I didn’t like using bikebiz’s site. Anecdotal sure, but I doubt I was the only person who didn’t like it. Actually, I’d say it’s a good bet because I like using their new site. Beyond a few specific examples above (and maybe one or two more if I thought about it) I can’t really outline /why/ this is so, just that it is. I feel the new site is better designed, more user friendly, and enables me to easily gain the information I want rather than getting in my way.

    There’s a few design companies here on flyingsolo I think. Easiest way of choosing which ones to talk to is to look at their portfolios and see what you like. Any Web Design companies which don’t list a bevvy of (verifiable) client projects, are probably worth steering clear of.

    With all that said, kudos on being up and running and out there doing business right now :)

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