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  • #1128724
    PRO
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    Zava Design, post: 147130 wrote:
    Which means…??

    I would almost guarantee, going on previous experience, that I could create a page called “Costs”, and create content that doesn’t mention any prices and would get more enquiries than the same named page showing prices.

    As said a couple of posts above, if you’re relying on prices to attract customers it’s always going to be a race to the bottom, as there’s always going to be someone cheaper than you out there.

    Which means, when I look at the stats for my website, after index.html. it is the second most popular page, always. I also seem to remember that town planning fees was a popular search phrase.

    #1128725
    JohnW
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    PRO, post: 147304 wrote:
    Some things are almost impossible to price upfront with any accuracy, especially litigation.

    I stand by my point of having prices is preferable to not in most circumstances, especially from me as a consumer. Except, in some specific circumstances, if there is no price I will move on to the next website.
    Hi Darryl,
    I’m with Matthew on this – it’s a grey area.

    Prospective customers need/won’t price indications.

    The problem is that most business people then fall into the trap of presuming their service is a commodity, if not, they end up promoting it as one.

    People MUST sell benefits and performance.

    If not, how can there be markets for:

    • Tata Nano 4-door hatchback: $US2,497.
    • Bugatti Veyron Super Sports: $US2,400,000.

    Aren’t they both simply transport from point A to B?

    Performance/quality in service industries can be very diffifcult to quantify but business owners MUST do it!
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1128726
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    JohnW, post: 147311 wrote:
    Hi Darryl,
    I’m with Matthew on this – it’s a grey area.

    Prospective customers need/won’t price indications.

    The problem is that most business people then fall into the trap of presuming their service is a commodity, if not, they end up promoting it as one.

    People MUST sell benefits and performance.

    If not, how can there be markets for:

    • Tata Nano 4-door hatchback: $US2,497.
    • Bugatti Veyron Super Sports: $US2,400,000.

    Aren’t they both simply transport from point A to B?

    Performance/quality in service industries can be very diffifcult to quantify but business owners MUST do it!
    Regs,
    JohnW

    Thanks for the discussion John, always appreciate hearing others opinions, especially someone like yours who can well and truly back their opinion up.

    #1128727
    Shaukat Adam Khalid
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    If you have to make prices available easily, make sure the justification or value is also available immediately and easily.

    Takes only a few seconds to be distracted.

    The correct way would be to start with a customer education / report lead magnet that positions the website as an authority site.

    #1128728
    Zava Design
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    MatthewKeath, post: 147303 wrote:
    It depends on the business.

    Some a definite YES.

    Some a definite NO.

    Others a grey area.
    Most valid answer so far.

    #1128729
    The Copy Chick
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    As a consumer, I prefer to have an idea of pricing before deciding whether or not to purchase.

    You can also eliminate a lot of tyre-kickers by listing pricing. Those looking for the cheapest will always be looking and are unlikely to be loyal customers.

    As others have mentioned, there will always be a market for those looking for the lowest price and those who are looking for high-end services and products. The trick is knowing who you want to target and HOW to appeal them.

    If you can adequately tick all the boxes they have, price shouldn’t be a deterrent.

    Zava Design, post: 146117 wrote:
    Many potential clients for some services are put off by just seeing a price they immediately think is “a lot” for a particular service. But get that same person on the end of the telephone (or in some cases even an email conversation) where you’re able to answer some of their specific questions, and the price becomes a secondary consideration. Ask any sales person.

    Which is why it’s crucial to adequately explain the benefits of your product/service to your potential consumer. If your site looks professional, is well-written, and you can explain why you charge more than your competitors, it’s likely people will be more than happy to pay extra for the perceived value you offer.

    A dodgy looking site with poor copy and no discernible benefits over the competition will see potential consumers moving to the next site in a heart beat.

    #1128730
    Zava Design
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    The Copy Chick, post: 147584 wrote:
    You can also eliminate a lot of tyre-kickers by listing pricing. Those looking for the cheapest will always be looking and are unlikely to be loyal customers.
    You don’t need to show prices to do that.

    As others have mentioned, there will always be a market for those looking for the lowest price and those who are looking for high-end services and products. The trick is knowing who you want to target and HOW to appeal them.

    And if you’re relying on showing prices to do that you have far bigger communication issues than worrying about budgets.

    All your points are valid, just none of them have to do with showing prices on your site or not.

    #1128731
    The Copy Chick
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    Zava Design, post: 147598 wrote:
    You don’t need to show prices to do that.

    No, you don’t need to, but it can be a very efficient way of doing so.

    Zava Design, post: 147598 wrote:
    And if you’re relying on showing prices to do that you have far bigger communication issues than worrying about budgets.

    Agreed, although that wasn’t really my point. My point was that people shouldn’t fear listing prices in case it drives customers to a cheaper provider. There is plenty of room in the market for all pricing levels, but if you are going the higher end, you need to be able to justify it.

    After not having pricing listed on my site for the last 2 years (largely due to being a service provider and each job requiring individual pricing, which makes on-the-spot pricing nigh on impossible), I’ve devised a way to give ball-park figures for my services, precisely because I don’t wan’t to be writing up quotes for people who don’t have the budget.

    These will be listed on my new website and I anticipate I may experience less queries, but a higher conversion rate due to those contacting me knowing what they need to budget for before they get in touch.

    But hey – at the end of the day, it comes down to what works best for the individual business. It may not be as viable for service-based business as it is for product-based businesses, but again, as a consumer, I certainly appreciate knowing prices up front whenever possible.

    #1128732
    Zava Design
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    The Copy Chick, post: 147658 wrote:
    No, you don’t need to, but it can be a very efficient way of doing so.
    It can also be a huge missed opportunity.

    I’ve lost count of the number of projects I’ve worked on where the client had an initial quoted budget significantly below the final project budget. Chance are they wouldn’t have contacted me at all if they had read some arbitrary prices on my website where their first impression was “Oh, that’s more than I want to spend”. In many cases, the client doesn’t actually know what they need. They may think they do, but there’s a reason – or their should be – why they’re looking to engage a professional: So they can utilise their expertise.

    There’s plenty of research to show that for many businesses/services there are far more benefits and opportunities that can arise from not listing prices.

    My point was that people shouldn’t fear listing prices in case it drives customers to a cheaper provider.

    And my point is that people shouldn’t fear NOT listing prices just because it might seem “easier” for a few reasons. Take the time to do the research, and work out ways to conduct tests for your business and your target audience to work out what will work better for you.

    #1128733
    John Romaine
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    As a consumer, I say put the prices on there. Nothing more irritating than not being able to see pricing.

    As an online marketer, I say split test it.

    More importantly, you should be tracking the amount of referrals that the website is bringing you.

    Are you doing this?

    #1128734
    Shaukat Adam Khalid
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    Update: Most valid so far.

    Lead by price, die by price.

    Zava Design, post: 147679 wrote:
    It can also be a huge missed opportunity.

    I’ve lost count of the number of projects I’ve worked on where the client had an initial quoted budget significantly below the final project budget. Chance are they wouldn’t have contacted me at all if they had read some arbitrary prices on my website where their first impression was “Oh, that’s more than I want to spend”. In many cases, the client doesn’t actually know what they need. They may think they do, but there’s a reason – or their should be – why they’re looking to engage a professional: So they can utilise their expertise.

    There’s plenty of research to show that for many businesses/services there are far more benefits and opportunities that can arise from not listing prices.

    And my point is that people shouldn’t fear NOT listing prices just because it might seem “easier” for a few reasons. Take the time to do the research, and work out ways to conduct tests for your business and your target audience to work out what will work better for you.

    #1128735
    The Copy Chick
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    Zava Design, post: 147679 wrote:
    It can also be a huge missed opportunity.

    Mabye… but that can work both ways. When booking accommodation for a holiday last year, there were a couple of places I didn’t bother contacting because they didn’t have their rates listed on their site. With plenty of other options listing rates, I wasn’t going to bother calling to find out if they were in my price-range or not. I simply moved on to the next site that gave me the information I needed to make a decision.

    With websites become online “shop fronts” it’s akin to going into a store where there are no prices on the items. It’s frustrating – as a consumer – to say the least.

    Zava Design, post: 147679 wrote:
    I’ve lost count of the number of projects I’ve worked on where the client had an initial quoted budget significantly below the final project budget. Chance are they wouldn’t have contacted me at all if they had read some arbitrary prices on my website where their first impression was “Oh, that’s more than I want to spend”. In many cases, the client doesn’t actually know what they need. They may think they do, but there’s a reason – or their should be – why they’re looking to engage a professional: So they can utilise their expertise.

    I agree that with service providers (like you and I) that don’t work with set prices that it can be a delicate and difficult area… and most prospects would understand that. But if you were selling widgets at $60 a piece or massages at $80 an hour, I’m assuming that would be the price and the client could either afford it or they could not. In that instance (which is similar to the OP’s situation) unless you were prepared to negotiate your prices, you would have nothing to lose by making your pricing transparent (IMHO).

    #1128736
    Zava Design
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    The Copy Chick, post: 147737 wrote:
    With websites become online “shop fronts” it’s akin to going into a store where there are no prices on the items. It’s frustrating – as a consumer – to say the least.
    And yet there are many stores that consciously do just this. Wonder why…?

    you would have nothing to lose by making your pricing transparent

    …and research that in some cases show otherwise.

    I and others have said a number of times it’s more a case by case, business & audience by business & audience decision, not a blanket approach. You seem to be going more down the one size fits all approach and I’m not really understanding why?

    And with regards to the OP, admittedly speaking from a non-professional in their area, I would have thought his type of service would be less likely to show prices, as it would be (like a doctor) more a service that is highly personalised to the individual patient than a “one-size-fits-all” approach. But as I said, I’ve never done any research into the relevant target audience so can’t say for sure.

    #1128737
    The Copy Chick
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    Zava Design, post: 147741 wrote:
    I and others have said a number of times it’s more a case by case, business & audience by business & audience decision, not a blanket approach. You seem to be going more down the one size fits all approach?

    Maybe you missed my previous comment.

    The Copy Chick, post: 147658 wrote:
    But hey – at the end of the day, it comes down to what works best for the individual business. It may not be as viable for service-based business as it is for product-based businesses, but again, as a consumer, I certainly appreciate knowing prices up front whenever possible.

    Besides, every debate requires the pros and cons to be explored. Between us I think we’ve done a great job :)

    #1128738
    Shane Walker
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    Hi Mesmer!

    This is a question I get asked quite often from people that I am mentoring and my answer is that it is generally better to place your prices on your website unless you are targeting extremely high value clients.

    Think of the likes of Mercedes or BMWs. Never once in any of their advertising do they mention the price simply because they are targeting affluent people and to them money does not come into it.

    If you start pushing or advertising based on price to high end customers, you will turn them off and they will go away. If you are looking at middle to low end customers, then, it is a good idea to place the pricing on your website as to remove obstacles and get them to perform the chosen action quicker.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,

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