Home – New Forums Tech talk Websites – how not to

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  • #975110
    SuzsSpace
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    I may regret this, it shows you what not to do when developing websites.

    http://webdesign.about.com/od/webdesignbasics/tp/little_web_of_horrors.htm

    #1072427
    OneArmedGraphics
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    not bad. could add no ‘comic sans’ Or papyrus too :)

    I don’t get the comment about regret though. We do mostly play nicely here?

    #1072428
    SuzsSpace
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    People are lovely here, I may have used the wrong phrase for this forum. Some of my friends are a little strange and I certainly would have regretted sending this to them.

    #1072429
    BrettM33
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    People who like to have a go at developing their own websites should read this; all this should be pretty much common sense to most seasoned designers (or at least I hope so LOL).

    #1072430
    B Cooper
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    I’ve seen a few websites that actually implement nearly every one of those pointers – gosh.

    Yes I agree, good resource for people looking to build their own sites.

    Brentis

    #1072431
    SuzsSpace
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    You’d expect it to be commonsense to seasoned web designers, but I’ve seen some doozies from people I would have thought would know what they were doing.

    #1072432
    John C.
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    That article does a great job of summing up pretty much every Myspace page I’ve ever visited!

    #1072433
    Tony Pfitzner
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    It’s not uncommon for customers to go for the white printing on black background thing. I can usually talk them out of it, but one insisted on it.

    What I suggested was that we set up a trial where we compared conversions from the black-on-white version with the white-on-black version using website optimiser. I figured I’d prove once and for all the folly of this white-on-black thing;)

    It didn’t work. White-on-black actually converted better.:o

    A really big web design no no – in my opinion is a failure to select a proper CMS like WordPress. Web designers who advocate some backyard CMS – because it’s easy to use – are really dudding their clients.

    #1072434
    SuzsSpace
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    Tony Pfitzner, post: 90808 wrote:
    It’s not uncommon for customers to go for the white printing on black background thing. I can usually talk them out of it, but one insisted on it.

    What I suggested was that we set up a trial where we compared conversions from the black-on-white version with the white-on-black version using website optimiser. I figured I’d prove once and for all the folly of this white-on-black thing;)

    It didn’t work. White-on-black actually converted better.:o

    A really big web design no no – in my opinion is a failure to select a proper CMS like WordPress. Web designers who advocate some backyard CMS – because it’s easy to use – are really dudding their clients.

    That’s interesting. It must depend on the market and demographic.

    #1072435
    BrettM33
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    Tony Pfitzner, post: 90808 wrote:
    A really big web design no no – in my opinion is a failure to select a proper CMS like WordPress. Web designers who advocate some backyard CMS – because it’s easy to use – are really dudding their clients.

    I’m speaking hypothetically here, but just because a CMS isn’t known very well doesn’t mean it’s a dud. You say “because it’s easy to use”; so if it’s easy to use then why is it so bad!? :p

    WordPress is a very very good and easy to use CMS/Blogging system, but that doesn’t mean it’s Taboo to use something else.

    #1072436
    Tony Pfitzner
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    SuzsSpace, post: 90836 wrote:
    That’s interesting. It must depend on the market and demographic.
    Agree completely. It will also depend on other design aspects of the page.
    #1072437
    Tony Pfitzner
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    CondorCreative, post: 90846 wrote:
    I’m speaking hypothetically here, but just because a CMS isn’t known very well doesn’t mean it’s a dud. You say “because it’s easy to use”; so if it’s easy to use then why is it so bad!? :p

    WordPress is a very very good and easy to use CMS/Blogging system, but that doesn’t mean it’s Taboo to use something else.
    I don’t want to sound too dogmatic about this, but I guess my opinions have hardened over the last year or two. To really promote a site well you need an arsenal of tools for on-page seo, sitemap generation, spam blocking, social media integration and automation, mobile capability etc etc, and possibly site specific applications.

    All of these requirements can be met with simple plugins using WordPress, but may not be available with another CMS with a smaller market and less active development. There is also a smaller technical support base and user community – hence higher costs – with other CMSs.

    The biggest issue is if your CMS does not have these capabilities, then the job either will not get done, or you will have to pay for custom coding. I think in a lot of cases it is the former that applies.

    #1072438
    BrettM33
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    Tony Pfitzner, post: 90851 wrote:
    I don’t want to sound too dogmatic about this, but I guess my opinions have hardened over the last year or two. To really promote a site well you need an arsenal of tools for on-page seo, sitemap generation, spam blocking, social media integration and automation, mobile capability etc etc, and possibly site specific applications.

    All of these requirements can be met with simple plugins using WordPress, but may not be available with another CMS with a smaller market and less active development. There is also a smaller technical support base and user community – hence higher costs – with other CMSs.

    The biggest issue is if your CMS does not have these capabilities, then the job either will not get done, or you will have to pay for custom coding. I think in a lot of cases it is the former that applies.

    Yeah I see what you’re saying. What I was just trying to get across was if the other CMS was just as good (including everything you need) then there is no-reason not to consider it just because WP is better known.

    Just like with products like music players for example… I choose to make an informed decision rather than just buy an iPod just because it’s the most well known and marketed.

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