Home – New Forums Marketing mastery What do you do when they say NO?

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  • #977758
    Safe Skies
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    Hi All

    Just thought id asked the question and see what you all do when you pitch a product or service and they say no.

    Ill start.

    We do have pretty unique products and i have the contact details and have contacted most of the businesses we sell to before.

    So i email or send a brochure or product info along with a basic sales letter/Email.

    I then leave it about 3/5 days maybe a bit longer and call them to see what they think about what i have sent them, ill ask some questions about what they think/how it compares to what they stock, any concerns regarding the products and then ill highlight the key features.

    If they do not sound to interested or its the wrong time i will offer them a free trial of the said product we ship and try it for say 30 days, we are very confident in all our products.

    Some of them accept this some still say no??

    What would you do or do you do?

    thanks

    G

    #1101078
    bridiej
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    Sitting on the side of the person saying no and still being pushed (which happened to me this week when I was cold called by a local Chamber member!), personally I would walk away and find another way to sell your product.

    There is nothing worse than someone being pushy.

    I’m sure most people are probably like me and dig their heels in further if they’re being pushed, rather than give up and say “Okay then, please send me your wonderful product”.

    “They” say cold calling works. Personally I’ve never, ever bought an item or signed up for a service as the result of a cold call.

    JMHO 😮

    #1101162
    bridiej
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    Sitting on the side of the person saying no and still being pushed (which happened to me this week when I was cold called by a local Chamber member!), personally I would walk away and find another way to sell your product.

    There is nothing worse than someone being pushy.

    I’m sure most people are probably like me and dig their heels in further if they’re being pushed, rather than give up and say “Okay then, please send me your wonderful product”.

    “They” say cold calling works. Personally I’ve never, ever bought an item or signed up for a service as the result of a cold call.

    JMHO 😮

    #1101164
    King
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    There are some sales cold call ‘experts’ on the forum so they will probably weigh in…but:

    Look at the % positive to negative – do a really good analysis on your past efforts.

    If you have had prior contact with them, then its not quite a cold call – it’s a warm one.

    Experimentation is the key: Try a few different approaches, maybe ring, say you will send an email with more details (the email will likely have the call to action) and then ring and follow up 3-5 days later and again 30 days later.

    Trial and error ;)

    #1101080
    King
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    There are some sales cold call ‘experts’ on the forum so they will probably weigh in…but:

    Look at the % positive to negative – do a really good analysis on your past efforts.

    If you have had prior contact with them, then its not quite a cold call – it’s a warm one.

    Experimentation is the key: Try a few different approaches, maybe ring, say you will send an email with more details (the email will likely have the call to action) and then ring and follow up 3-5 days later and again 30 days later.

    Trial and error ;)

    #1101166
    JacquiPryor
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    I am totally with Bridie on this one – the more I am chased, the more I want to say no even if the product/service is truly a good one.

    I am more than happy to keep details on file so that I can contact if/when I am ready for the product or service. I am open to one follow up but keep hassling me without my ok after that and I will move on.

    My business provides services that I think every other person in business could use – so, I appreciate it can be upsetting when someone says ‘no’ to what you have to offer… in your case you know how fantastic your product is and it can be hard if someone doesn’t see it.

    I do the same thing – follow up but I don’t do it 3-5 days later, I think this is too soon. This is obviously a personal preference – but, if you emailed me one day and then rang only 3 days later, I would be thinking “you only just emailed me, give me a chance to think about it” Plus, the person you are contacting might not be the ‘decision maker’ so they need some time to discuss with others and make a decision. I wonder if a call 10-14 days later could make a difference?

    I follow up around 14 days after initial contact (which in my case is them instigating the first contact) just to make sure they received the information and do they have any questions etc. Apart from reminding them they can contact me any time with questions/no fee for answering them I don’t pressure them to ‘buy’. I would say somewhere around 70% at least email me back with an ‘update’ from their end. If they seem interested but just ‘not yet’ I make a note to touch-base around 14 days later, always with a quick email to see how things are going… I find that after the 3rd or 4th contact in most cases (spread out over probably a couple of months all up) people are ready to engage my services. If they tell me they are not interested at any one of these contacts then I tend to let it go and move to the next prospect.

    If people are still saying no to receiving a free trial, could it be that they have agreements to distribute a competing product so couldn’t accept yours even if they wanted to? Try asking why they don’t want a free trial, as this could help you improve future promotional efforts. I think a lot of people if asked nicely and in the spirit of improving customer service would let you know why they are not accepting product at this time.

    Perhaps try asking them if they are not interested then and there if they would be open to receiving new brochures/price lists as they become available? A quick touch-base call in a few months? Some way to keep them on your contact list for future promotions.

    Just my 2c :)

    #1101082
    JacquiPryor
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    I am totally with Bridie on this one – the more I am chased, the more I want to say no even if the product/service is truly a good one.

    I am more than happy to keep details on file so that I can contact if/when I am ready for the product or service. I am open to one follow up but keep hassling me without my ok after that and I will move on.

    My business provides services that I think every other person in business could use – so, I appreciate it can be upsetting when someone says ‘no’ to what you have to offer… in your case you know how fantastic your product is and it can be hard if someone doesn’t see it.

    I do the same thing – follow up but I don’t do it 3-5 days later, I think this is too soon. This is obviously a personal preference – but, if you emailed me one day and then rang only 3 days later, I would be thinking “you only just emailed me, give me a chance to think about it” Plus, the person you are contacting might not be the ‘decision maker’ so they need some time to discuss with others and make a decision. I wonder if a call 10-14 days later could make a difference?

    I follow up around 14 days after initial contact (which in my case is them instigating the first contact) just to make sure they received the information and do they have any questions etc. Apart from reminding them they can contact me any time with questions/no fee for answering them I don’t pressure them to ‘buy’. I would say somewhere around 70% at least email me back with an ‘update’ from their end. If they seem interested but just ‘not yet’ I make a note to touch-base around 14 days later, always with a quick email to see how things are going… I find that after the 3rd or 4th contact in most cases (spread out over probably a couple of months all up) people are ready to engage my services. If they tell me they are not interested at any one of these contacts then I tend to let it go and move to the next prospect.

    If people are still saying no to receiving a free trial, could it be that they have agreements to distribute a competing product so couldn’t accept yours even if they wanted to? Try asking why they don’t want a free trial, as this could help you improve future promotional efforts. I think a lot of people if asked nicely and in the spirit of improving customer service would let you know why they are not accepting product at this time.

    Perhaps try asking them if they are not interested then and there if they would be open to receiving new brochures/price lists as they become available? A quick touch-base call in a few months? Some way to keep them on your contact list for future promotions.

    Just my 2c :)

    #1101084
    Safe Skies
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    Thanks Guys

    Just to confirm, we are not pushy at all and its because of this i want to have a few other options to stay in touch with the owners.

    we bring out new and unique products a few times a year so that always helps, we have a good relationship with most of the retailers in Australia so we do have touch points.

    What else do you use to stay in touch and relevant?

    Just to confirm we are never pushsy.

    Thanks again.

    G

    #1101168
    Safe Skies
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    Thanks Guys

    Just to confirm, we are not pushy at all and its because of this i want to have a few other options to stay in touch with the owners.

    we bring out new and unique products a few times a year so that always helps, we have a good relationship with most of the retailers in Australia so we do have touch points.

    What else do you use to stay in touch and relevant?

    Just to confirm we are never pushsy.

    Thanks again.

    G

    #1101086
    King
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    3-5 days is the universally accepted (by all the marketing advice out there) timeframe for follow-up. Any longer and the prospect has totally forgotten about it.

    #1101170
    King
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    3-5 days is the universally accepted (by all the marketing advice out there) timeframe for follow-up. Any longer and the prospect has totally forgotten about it.

    #1101087
    Safe Skies
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    Thanks for that,

    I guess the issue we have is we have say 1000 stores who can stock our type of product, so we know who these businesses are and they need the type of product we produce.

    I guess they have the option to go with us or another provider, our products are only available from us.

    If you have a limited number of stores to sell to we need and try to make our ways of working fit them and benefit them as good as possible.

    G

    #1101172
    Safe Skies
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    Thanks for that,

    I guess the issue we have is we have say 1000 stores who can stock our type of product, so we know who these businesses are and they need the type of product we produce.

    I guess they have the option to go with us or another provider, our products are only available from us.

    If you have a limited number of stores to sell to we need and try to make our ways of working fit them and benefit them as good as possible.

    G

    #1101089
    JacquiPryor
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    I guess the issue we have is we have say 1000 stores who can stock our type of product, so we know who these businesses are and they need the type of product we produce.

    This is the same problem I have – how many businesses operate in Australia? Well, that’s how many can use my services and that’s how many I know need the service I provide – but, obviously this is a lot of businesses and it’s really not likely that everyone will end up my client. Part of the challenge I have faced is coming up with the right way to explain to people why it is they need my services. It sounds like you have the same challenge – to convince the stores they need your product.

    It might be as simple as rejigging your initial ‘sales’ letter or email to make sure that the problem you are solving for them with your product is known immediately so they see it the second they open or receive your contact.
    Where possible, personalise the contact too rather than it looking too templated – I think people are more likely to read (especially when it comes in the post) if it likes like something fancy for them rather than a ‘marketing letter’. Include a handwritten with comps slip with any brochures you post and invite them to discuss the advantages that your product can bring their business/customers etc.

    #1101174
    JacquiPryor
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    • Total posts: 2,344
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    I guess the issue we have is we have say 1000 stores who can stock our type of product, so we know who these businesses are and they need the type of product we produce.

    This is the same problem I have – how many businesses operate in Australia? Well, that’s how many can use my services and that’s how many I know need the service I provide – but, obviously this is a lot of businesses and it’s really not likely that everyone will end up my client. Part of the challenge I have faced is coming up with the right way to explain to people why it is they need my services. It sounds like you have the same challenge – to convince the stores they need your product.

    It might be as simple as rejigging your initial ‘sales’ letter or email to make sure that the problem you are solving for them with your product is known immediately so they see it the second they open or receive your contact.
    Where possible, personalise the contact too rather than it looking too templated – I think people are more likely to read (especially when it comes in the post) if it likes like something fancy for them rather than a ‘marketing letter’. Include a handwritten with comps slip with any brochures you post and invite them to discuss the advantages that your product can bring their business/customers etc.

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