Home – New Forums Marketing mastery What do you look for when seeking a legal advice for your business?

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #978017
    Kennethti
    Member
    • Total posts: 415
    Up
    0
    ::

    As the title said, I’m keen to find out what all of you think when choosing a legal professional to assist you with any issues or transactional matters.

    For some reason nobody likes lawyers and small businesses tend to shy away from them. Eventually however they do come through, but on a variety of reasons!

    How do you make your decision? Common reasons that I have heard are:

    • I have come to know you personally and trust you to use your services.
    • I have been referred to you by someone I trust.
    • I believe you are cost-effective.
    • I found your website on-line and you seem to know what you’re talking about.
    #1104185
    JacquiPryor
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,344
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Kenneth,

    I tend to make this decision based on the area of law that I require advice in relation to. I tend to shy away from a lawyer that practices a little bit of everything and would keep hunting until I found one specialising in the are I need… I am not going to see a lawyer whose experience is mostly in wills if I need help negotiating the sale of a business for example.

    #1104186
    PaulThomas
    Member
    • Total posts: 76
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Kenneth,

    I will disagree with you, and that’s good thing. I don’t think people dislike Lawyers, rather, they dislike the legal process when they have a matter to be defended or fought.

    Lawyers are a bit like Dentists really, at some point we all need one. We don’t hate the Dentist, just the process.

    I think most people, (referring to small business owners for this reply) who find that they are in trouble or need to file a statement of claim etc. will do their Google homework first, attempting find an easy answer or try to solve the problem themselves.

    Once a prospect realises the scope of the legal system they will then search for a Solicitor or ask someone for a referral. In my case I approached a large law firm to help with a claim. Ha, size is not a measure of service. I then went to my friend, a Solicitor, but as I suspected he didn’t want to branch in to commercial law just for me.

    I then did some searches on Google and found a local firm that I was aware of but never had any dealings with. One phone call and I was confident that I would get the attention I needed. Phone manner, good listening skills and empathy had me sold by the end of the call. The advice I recieved saved me a heap of trouble and money.

    Great marketing is the key to building a strong brand. Marketing, not advertising, should encompass everything, from answering calls to sending invoices. The brand personality must permeate the entire business culture.

    I couldn’t help notice your website … I know red is a strong colour and means good luck in some Asian cultures (my wife is Thai/Viet). But I would choose blue as it stands for credibility and longevity. Look at NRMA, ANZ, AXA, AMP – the list goes on.

    Wow, this is a long reply – who do I invoice? Ha ha, I’m just getting you guys back! I would be happy to offer some ideas that could boost your leads by 80% to 100% – Pro Bono. If you like DM me or follow me on Twitter, I have followed you!

    Best regards,
    Paul

    #1104187
    Steve_Minshall
    Member
    • Total posts: 518
    Up
    0
    ::

    Based on my most recent experience a return phone call would be a good start.

    So far I have found the No1 criteria I have used for choosing a legal is that they weren’t the one I use last time:).

    I had one good experience with a lawyer and thought I had nailed it then went back recently for something else, same firm, same person and useless.

    There seems to be a rule with this sort of professional (and accountants) you get a good one and word spreads, then they either become overloaded or they grow the firm and delegate to juniors and they are no longer that special.

    #1104188
    DJ_m
    Member
    • Total posts: 147
    Up
    0
    ::
    PaulThomas, post: 115492 wrote:
    I couldn’t help notice your website … I know red is a strong colour and means good luck in some Asian cultures (my wife is Thai/Viet). But I would choose blue as it stands for credibility and longevity. Look at NRMA, ANZ, AXA, AMP – the list goes on.

    Best not fly with Virgin or Qantas, insure with AAMI, post with Australia Post, Bank with Westpac, the list goes on.

    #1104189
    DJ_m
    Member
    • Total posts: 147
    Up
    0
    ::
    Steve_Minshall, post: 115606 wrote:
    .

    So far I have found the No1 criteria I have used for choosing a legal is that they weren’t the one I use last time:).

    Gold!

    #1104190
    PaulThomas
    Member
    • Total posts: 76
    Up
    0
    ::
    DJ_m, post: 115788 wrote:
    Best not fly with Virgin or Qantas, insure with AAMI, post with Australia Post, Bank with Westpac, the list goes on.

    Red is power, strength, energy and emotion, it’s not a peaceful colour. Blue represents loyalty, reliability, stability and calmness.

    There’s heaps of psychology behind choosing the best corporte colours. Choosing the right colour for a brand can mean the difference between making a great brand brilliant or just remaining average. Actually your website and collateral need careful colour choices too. (Not yours DJ_m, businesses in general).

    There’s nothing wrong with red at all. But then there’s nothing wrong with any colour. For me, I would avoid red subconsciously when choosing a law firm. Or perhaps red may work in a smaller amount, more subtle.

    If you look at corporations who don’t know what colour to use, such as Yahoo!, trouble isn’t far away. Yahoo! chooses what ever colour is going at the time. Playful as that may seem, it isn’t good for building a brand’s strength. However, that’s not the main reason Yahoo! is struggling but it shows me they have a disjointed identity. (On top of that, if your business name has an exclamation mark, there’s a good chance every time someone types your business name it will be broken. More psychology but it does have an effect).

    Anyway, there’s a lot more to using the right (brand) colours than people realise. The next time you do business with a new provider, have a little think about the things that added up in your mind that encourged you to contact them over their competitors!

    Cheers,
    Paul

    #1104191
    DJ_m
    Member
    • Total posts: 147
    Up
    0
    ::
    PaulThomas, post: 115797 wrote:
    Red is power, strength, energy and emotion, it’s not a peaceful colour. Blue represents loyalty, reliability, stability and calmness.

    There’s heaps of psychology behind choosing the best corporte colours. Choosing the right colour for a brand can mean the difference between making a great brand brilliant or just remaining average. Actually your website and collateral need careful colour choices too. (Not yours DJ_m, businesses in general).

    There’s nothing wrong with red at all. But then there’s nothing wrong with any colour. For me, I would avoid red subconsciously when choosing a law firm. Or perhaps red may work in a smaller amount, more subtle.

    If you look at corporations who don’t know what colour to use, such as Yahoo!, trouble isn’t far away. Yahoo! chooses what ever colour is going at the time. Playful as that may seem, it isn’t good for building a brand’s strength. However, that’s not the main reason Yahoo! is struggling but it shows me they have a disjointed identity. (On top of that, if your business name has an exclamation mark, there’s a good chance every time someone types your business name it will be broken. More psychology but it does have an effect).

    Anyway, there’s a lot more to using the right (brand) colours than people realise. The next time you do business with a new provider, have a little think about the things that added up in your mind that encourged you to contact them over their competitors!

    Cheers,
    Paul

    I think there are those that look more deeply in to this than others. If you can show me any kind of real evidence of a group of companies with one corporate colour against a similar group in another colour and a measurable difference in performance then I’d be the first to read it. Otherwise, you are are just confirming my thoughts that there are far too many psychologists, writers, marketers and feng shui experts with far too much time thinking up crackpot ideas to ream more of us (mostly you) out of our hard earned cash.

    By your above statement then Google are totally screwed!

    Ten most successful companies (by revenue) of all time (and their corporate colours)

    Walmart – Blue
    ExxonMobil – Red
    Royal Dutch Shell – Yellow and Red
    BP – Yellow & Green
    Sinopec – Blue
    Toyota – Red
    PetroChina – Red
    Total SA – Mostly Red
    Chevron – Red & Blue (or blue and red if you like)
    Japan Post – Red

    World’s ten largest law firms

    Baker McKenzie – Red
    Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom – Red
    Clifford Chance – Grey/Green
    Linklaters – Purple
    Latham Watkins – Red
    Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer – Blue
    Allen & Overy – Red
    Jones Day – Blue
    Kirland Ellis – Blue
    Sidley Austin – Mostly black/white

    So what does this tell us?

    Absolutely nothing of course.

    Please show me something, anything, that backs up a statement suggesting that a particular colour

    can mean the difference between making a great brand brilliant or just remaining average

    ?

    And if I am honest, on a personal level, I’d be far more inclined to show the door to someone who started saying things like ‘red is emotion and blue is loyalty’ before I threw out someone who had painted their head green.

    #1104192
    PaulThomas
    Member
    • Total posts: 76
    Up
    0
    ::
    DJ_m, post: 115805 wrote:
    there are far too many psychologists, writers, marketers and feng shui experts with far too much time thinking up crackpot ideas to ream more of us (mostly you) out of our hard earned cash.

    Not sure what (mostly you) refers to, I haven’t ever had cash reamed out of me! Or have I, well my wife does that every weekend!

    I’m not a psychologist I just understand the principles of great design, and that specific elements can work to connect a brand with an audience. Companies, some of them you mentioned, have spent millions just on their logo.

    The excercise is to find a sweet spot. Brand/Logo design is not art, it is objective, not subjective. If all the elements work together to capture a huge chunk of the targeted audience great! That’s worth a lot of money to an organisation.

    Google is consistent in it’s use of colours and Google is for everyone, hence the diverse (4 colours) colour scheme. They play with the logo on special occasions. But they dominate the search arena so they can do what they like. But they are always consistent.

    DJ_m, post: 115805 wrote:
    Please show me something, anything, that backs up a statement suggesting that a particular colour ?

    Coca Cola = Red/White vs Pepsi = Blue/Red/White – Which company leads the market?

    Actually, Coca Cola did an experiment in a backwoods town in the USA, they changed the colour (color, they’re still in inches there) of their cans that they supplied to every outlet in the town. Sales fell to zero (no, before Coke Zero) over night. They decided to keep the red and white cans. Yes, they use black too, I’m just avoiding the impending ambush :)

    Okay, plenty said about colour, except I will mention that 1 in 5 men are colour blind. And outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend, inside a dog it’s too dark to read. – Marx, (no the funny one)

    Cheers and good night, 晚安, Buenas noches, chúc ngu ngon
    Paul

    #1104193
    DJ_m
    Member
    • Total posts: 147
    Up
    0
    ::
    PaulThomas, post: 115810 wrote:
    I’m not a psychologist I just understand the principles of great design, and that specific elements can work to connect a brand with an audience. Companies, some of them you mentioned, have spent millions just on their logo.

    The excercise is to find a sweet spot. Brand/Logo design is not art, it is objective, not subjective. If all the elements work together to capture a huge chunk of the targeted audience great! That’s worth a lot of money to an organisation.

    But this has nothing to do with colour. You suggested the OP change the colour of his website?

    PaulThomas, post: 115810 wrote:
    Coca Cola = Red/White vs Pepsi = Blue/Red/White – Which company leads the market?

    Actually, Coca Cola did an experiment in a backwoods town in the USA, they changed the colour (color, they’re still in inches there) of their cans that they supplied to every outlet in the town. Sales fell to zero (no, before Coke Zero) over night. They decided to keep the red and white cans. Yes, they use black too, I’m just avoiding the impending ambush :)

    I thought you were originally saying he should move away from red?

    Regardless, I don’t believe these urban myths of “they changed the colour (color, they’re still in inches there) of their cans that they supplied to every outlet in the town. Sales fell to zero”. Is there any documented proof of this.

    But I digress, you said red was not good and he should change and now you are saying that changing is bad?

    You are suggesting that coca-cola is more successful than Pepsi because their cans are red instead of blue?

    Please. There are as many successful companies with one colour as there are in any other colour. We can;t be suggesting to people that they chage their website/corporate colours because it is less cuddly than another. I think his website looks fine.

    #1104194
    PaulThomas
    Member
    • Total posts: 76
    Up
    0
    ::
    DJ_m, post: 115812 wrote:
    Please. There are as many successful companies with one colour as there are in any other colour. We can;t be suggesting to people that they chage their website/corporate colours because it is less cuddly than another. I think his website looks fine.

    Ok.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.