Home – New Forums Tech talk Which CMS (Content Management System) is the most popular?

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  • #1146982
    websitedesigner
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    I find it funny that we are still having the same argument about custom CMS’s or no CMS’s that we were having 5 years ago. If you think WordPress is only for simple sites I’d say you are mistaken. You are also mistaken if you think WordPress is only for low traffic sites. it’s now powering 52% of the world’s biggest blogs.

    I’ve found that most of the people who give advice against using an open source tool like WordPress (and trying to scare people away from it) have their own system that they are trying to sell. This has been going on for years. But people are getting wise to it. These days people can build their own sites with tools like WordPress. Squarespace, Shopify etc and are no longer going to blindly follow the advice of their developer. Which I think is very good news.

    On the original post, I think it’s the case that they are only looking at ‘known’ CMS’s. So a big chunk of websites no doubt have some sort of CMS (because before WordPress people though it made sense to code their own).

    #1146983
    Chris H
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    I can only believe that anyone taking serious exception to WordPress is being driven by commercial reasons.
    Last year I created my own WordPress website.
    I’m not a noob when it comes to technology, I have used the full Adobe suite in the past and a few years back got into Dreamweaver and Golive.
    The ease at which WordPress is installed and customised really makes me wonder why anyone would look anywhere else for the majority of small business websites.

    The objections raised about security are not particular to WordPress, but to the setup of a web page.
    On the shelf life of a CMS, this is a point where I think the big name CMS providers have it nailed. I personally would never again pay somone to custom code a site for me unless it required something particularly special. The risks with having an orphan and unsupported development is simply too high. Especially when you consider WordPress is constantly updated and supported. Above all that, the cost is zero, so if the platform no longer becomes viable in the future my loss will be $0
    The plugins available for WordPress also add huge functionality, I’m especially impressed with “SEO by Yoast”.
    Wordpress sites are also incredibly friendly for SEO.

    #1146984
    eWAY
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    I mean no disrespect here Chris, but it sounds like your site is possibly one of the WordPress sites out there that is open to security issues.

    I’d be interested to know what kind of security practices you have used to ensure the installation is locked down and not susceptible to infection? There is a large scale attack on WordPress installations in particular that started earlier in the year seeing over 90,000 servers being infected as of April. These servers are effectively then put to task infecting other machines. The end goal? Get enough machines together that you can brute force attack any system and break in.

    I’m not trying to fear-monger, rather make sure that small business owners understand what can happen by following the famous 5 minute install and just installing a few plugins. Administrating a website requires far more dedication and knowledge than that.

    Of course if you’re using WordPress.com’s services I retract my statement and you’ve made a great decision in using a professionally hosted system.

    Maclean

    Chris H, post: 169456 wrote:
    I can only believe that anyone taking serious exception to WordPress is being driven by commercial reasons.
    Last year I created my own WordPress website.
    I’m not a noob when it comes to technology, I have used the full Adobe suite in the past and a few years back got into Dreamweaver and Golive.
    The ease at which WordPress is installed and customised really makes me wonder why anyone would look anywhere else for the majority of small business websites.

    The objections raised about security are not particular to WordPress, but to the setup of a web page.
    On the shelf life of a CMS, this is a point where I think the big name CMS providers have it nailed. I personally would never again pay somone to custom code a site for me unless it required something particularly special. The risks with having an orphan and unsupported development is simply too high. Especially when you consider WordPress is constantly updated and supported. Above all that, the cost is zero, so if the platform no longer becomes viable in the future my loss will be $0
    The plugins available for WordPress also add huge functionality, I’m especially impressed with “SEO by Yoast”.
    Wordpress sites are also incredibly friendly for SEO.

    #1146985
    Chris H
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    Hello Maclean,

    Thank you for your concern.
    I am always mindful of security, I have my WordPress installation running through Cloudflare for caching, I wouldn’t imagine that a brute force attack would reach my server.

    #1146986
    JohnTranter
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    Chris H, post: 169485 wrote:
    I have my WordPress installation running through Cloudflare for caching, I wouldn’t imagine that a brute force attack would reach my server.

    That’s a nice tip. I didn’t know Cloudflare had all those security features, I thought it was purely a cdn vehicle.
    I’m a bit curious about how it implements the SSL certificate features though

    #1146987
    eWAY
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    Chris H, post: 169485 wrote:
    Hello Maclean,

    Thank you for your concern.
    I am always mindful of security, I have my WordPress installation running through Cloudflare for caching, I wouldn’t imagine that a brute force attack would reach my server.

    Great to hear you did your research and Cloudflare works amazingly well with WordPress. You’re right that it protects well against brute force attacks as long as you have your direct connection subdomain set to something nice and obscure (and not just something like direct.yourdomain.com) or even better you have it disabled when not in use.

    I’d love to see Auttomatic team up with CloudFlare to see WordPress come preconfigured with it. Now that would be a step towards a more secure Internet!

    Maclean

    #1146988
    Chris H
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    Yes, it’s a very neat system, especially for the $0 price tag.
    For anyone that wants to implement Cloudflare on WordPress, there’s a great plugin: http://wordpress.org/plugins/cloudflare/

    #1146989
    Lucid Web Design
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    I think the evidence is clear. WordPress is the most popular. They have done that with a mixture of good luck and good marketing. Being able to set a a free blog fairly quickly is a stroke of genius.

    The debate about which is the best CMS is probably a bit like asking which football team is best :) The question should really be which best suits your needs. I tend to use Drupal or WordPress.

    I like Drupal’s coding standards. It is elegant and well commented which makes it easier to play with. It’s use of taxonomy when combined with custom fields and the Views module make it a strong contender for any job. Most of the modules integrate well into the core. It is however a steep learning curve which makes it easy to give up on.

    Wordpress OTOH is a lot easier to use. It will suit most sites perfectly. It definitely beats Drupal for ease of use. However, I have found that some plugins don’t integrate well with the core. I have inherited an online shop built of WordPress and I have say it is a complete nightmare. I’m starting again using Drupal Commerce because I know can deliver what the client wants and have room for future features.

    There is also a lot to be said for having static site with no CMS. They can be lean, fast loading and not bloated like some CMS sites can be. You could also use something like Jekyll which runs on Ruby http://jekyllrb.com

    #1146990
    Greg_M
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    Just to be a bit controversial.

    I think platforms like Squarespace, are going to nail all the Open Source CMS’s in the long term unless they’re on similar hosted platforms.

    I’ve been experimenting with Jekyll a little … looks quite handy, seems to be getting a run for blogging without a database.

    Sinatra, is a very good lightweight framework if you want to use Ruby.

    It’s now pretty easy to host Ruby sites for zip, on some of the PaaS platforms.

    #1146991
    MatthewKeath
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    Lucid Web Design, post: 169819 wrote:
    I think the evidence is clear. WordPress is the most popular. They have done that with a mixture of good luck and good marketing. Being able to set a a free blog fairly quickly is a stroke of genius.

    The debate about which is the best CMS is probably a bit like asking which football team is best :) The question should really be which best suits your needs. I tend to use Drupal or WordPress.

    I like Drupal’s coding standards. It is elegant and well commented which makes it easier to play with. It’s use of taxonomy when combined with custom fields and the Views module make it a strong contender for any job. Most of the modules integrate well into the core. It is however a steep learning curve which makes it easy to give up on.

    Wordpress OTOH is a lot easier to use. It will suit most sites perfectly. It definitely beats Drupal for ease of use. However, I have found that some plugins don’t integrate well with the core. I have inherited an online shop built of WordPress and I have say it is a complete nightmare. I’m starting again using Drupal Commerce because I know can deliver what the client wants and have room for future features.

    There is also a lot to be said for having static site with no CMS. They can be lean, fast loading and not bloated like some CMS sites can be. You could also use something like Jekyll which runs on Ruby http://jekyllrb.comIs that WPEC?

    Worst plugin ever. Check out WooCommerce, easy to use for the client, much easier that Drupal, and has awesome features.

    #1146992
    Lucid Web Design
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    MatthewKeath, post: 169831 wrote:
    Is that WPEC?

    Worst plugin ever. Check out WooCommerce, easy to use for the client, much easier that Drupal, and has awesome features.

    It is Shopp. Not quite WPEC but runs a close second I think. I agree that WooCommerce is awesome. It was a strong contender but it doesn’t quite do everything I need.

    The site I’ve got is such a mess, the best thing to do is to demolish it and start again. I need to create some custom content types and integrate them with the product line. I have a number of other features I need to add plus leaving room for future add ons. I also need to play around with fine grained user permissions and taxonomies. I find Drupal handles this situation better than WordPress. I’ve tied something similar in WordPress but the result was not so much coherent web site but more like a federation of autonomous states.

    If it were a regular site requiring content updates and commerce, then the combination of WordPress & Woocommerce would be pretty hard to beat.

    #1146993
    Lucid Web Design
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    estim8, post: 169826 wrote:
    Just to be a bit controversial.

    I think platforms like Squarespace, are going to nail all the Open Source CMS’s in the long term unless they’re on similar hosted platforms.

    I’ve been experimenting with Jekyll a little … looks quite handy, seems to be getting a run for blogging without a database.

    Sinatra, is a very good lightweight framework if you want to use Ruby.

    It’s now pretty easy to host Ruby sites for zip, on some of the PaaS platforms.

    I think Squarespace has a lot going for it. It is pretty impressive. I can see it appealing to the business who want a DIY site that works well and looks great. I don’t think it will take long for others to see what they are doing an move into that space as well. I think there is space for the likes of Squarespace and open source CMS’s.

    Sinatra looks interesting. I must try it out.

    #1146994
    whooyeah
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    As a developer I don’t really like working with php.

    The best .NET CMS I’ve worked with is Umbraco

    #1146995
    JohnTranter
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    whooyeah, post: 170698 wrote:
    As a developer I don’t really like working with php.

    The best .NET CMS I’ve worked with is Umbraco

    Ha! Tell me about it. I’d much prefer to still be using C# and Microsoft’s development tools, but I had to go where the work is. I found it difficult to get asp.net work without being part of agency, how you going with it?
    (I once had a play with DotNetNuke but hated it, I assume Umbraco is much better)

    #1146996
    whooyeah
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    JohnTranter, post: 170825 wrote:
    (I once had a play with DotNetNuke but hated it, I assume Umbraco is much better)

    DotNetNuke is terrible. The interface is clunky. Umbraco has a steep learning curve but is extremely flexible.

    I have a few ongoing clients. With new clients I like to put them to .NET platforms.

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