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  • #987753
    Greg_M
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    I had a friend drop in today, busting to try out WordPress.

    Smarty me, said no problem, can do that in a few minutes … did the install just fine, but I hit the update to 3.9 button, and the WYSIWYG editor stopped working.

    No toolbar, and can’t enter anything into the box (I did get a line of red dots, but thats all).

    Mucked about for a while, two computers, different browsers, changed themes … still busted.

    A quick Google indicated the issue may be TinyMCE/editor is broken by the update.

    So many WordPress gurus here, thought someone may have already resolved the issue ( or have I done something dumb).

    I haven’t used WP for a while, and the admin interface has changed quite a bit, but all the usual stuff was there, just a bit prettier. Did I miss something?

    Thanks

    #1164196
    Lucid Web Design
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    I run a couple of sites on WordPress and they both were upgraded to 3.9 with no problems. I don’t think it was you.

    I’d start with checking your file permissions. If you don’t have file write permission on some files then they wont change when you do the upgrade.

    As a general rule, most files will be either 755 or 644. This link explains permissions if you don’t know what I mean. http://docs.joomla.org/How_do_UNIX_file_permissions_work%3F I know this relates to Joomla, but is about Unix.

    If you have shell access, you can check off your directories and files. If you host doesn’t allow to access aUnix shell, then a program called FileZilla will allow you to connect to your server and change permissions (although its primary role is to transfer files)

    There is WordPress documentation that explains which files and directories have which permissions.
    http://codex.wordpress.org/Changing_File_Permissions

    I hope this is of some help.

    Regards
    Derek

    #1164197
    Greg_M
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    Thanks for the reply.

    Long time Linux user, so file permissions are familiar territory (not particularly good at them though :)).

    The platform I installed on is a Cloud platform Openshift, they just happened to have a script install for WordPress … so I gave it a run. I’ve used it before for WordPress without issue, so I assumed the permission side was all OK, maybe not.

    Deployment and local install is done via SSH, cloning or pushing a Git version repository from a terminal … I haven’t cloned it locally, so I haven’t had a look under the hood.

    I use this platform for deploying Ruby stuff normally, the WordPress adventure was just doing a friend a favour.

    My initial search indicated some were having issues with the editor, so I was being a bit of an opportunist hoping someone here had a simple fix (given most/many are using WordPress).

    No great stress, I won’t be spending too much time on it … they’re already having a serious look at Wix :).

    #1164198
    Lucid Web Design
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    estim8, post: 189984 wrote:
    Thanks for the reply.

    Long time Linux user, so file permissions are familiar territory (not particularly good at them though :)).

    The platform I installed on is a Cloud platform Openshift, they just happened to have a script install for WordPress … so I gave it a run. I’ve used it before for WordPress without issue, so I assumed the permission side was all OK, maybe not.

    Deployment and local install is done via SSH, cloning or pushing a Git version repository from a terminal … I haven’t cloned it locally, so I haven’t had a look under the hood.

    I use this platform for deploying Ruby stuff normally, the WordPress adventure was just doing a friend a favour.

    My initial search indicated some were having issues with the editor, so I was being a bit of an opportunist hoping someone here had a simple fix (given most/many are using WordPress).

    No great stress, I won’t be spending too much time on it … they’re already having a serious look at Wix :).

    It sounded like a permissions issue to me. A few chmod commands might fix it. It might be worth looking at ownership as well. I’ve similar issues where files have some been changed from the user to apache, so some chown commands might fix it too.

    I have to confess to not being a WordPress guru myself. I’ve done a few sites with it & teach it at my local community centre but am by no means an expert. My CMS of choice is normally Drupal.

    Having said that, Drupal seems to suffer bloat and I’d like to use something that is flexible and light weight as an alternative. I’ve been looking at Ruby. I’ve been experimenting with LocomotiveCMS. I’ve been impressed by the speed. I’m at the very early stages. I’m still trying to get my head around how to deploy to a production server. I’ll get there.

    Wix has improved quite a lot lately. I used to turn my nose up at it but I’ve learned not to be such a snob :)

    regards
    Derek

    #1164199
    Greg_M
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    I wasn’t familiar with “locomotive” had a quick look, seems an interesting CMS.

    I’m normally building from scratch using Rails or Sinatra, haven’t tried any of the CMS packages.

    Deploying most Ruby projects requires getting your head around Git version control, deploying to an actual production server is a pain. Using Capistrano is the only way I’ve done it successfully.

    If you want to get into Ruby platforms or frameworks, I’d suggest forgetting about conventional servers. The available Cloud platforms are too good to ignore.

    Most are free until you scale seriously, Heroku is probably the smoothest to use and most mature platform.

    I think you’ll find with a bit of homework, you’ll deploy locomotive easily to Heroku … did have a quick look at their docs …seems configured for it … anything running on Rails will deploy OK. Same applies to Openshift, it’s just not as polished.

    I did try Drupal (along with most of the open source CMS’s), but Ruby got me in.

    If you’re serious about lightweight, and blistering fast, the Sinatra framework will let you do anything, not very easy to learn how it works though.

    My ongoing experiment (and future likely tool of choice) is Node.js and the tools built for it.

    And yes, Wix and others have come a long way … glad I’m not competing against them.

    #1164200
    Lucid Web Design
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    Thanks for that. It looks like Heroku is the way to go then. :) I’m still stuck in conventional thinking. I’ve been trying to work out how to deploy to my Linode VPS LAMP server and not getting very far. The cloud seems to to be the way.

    I’ll check out Sinatra. It did look at it a while back and it looked a little daunting. I’ll give it another go.

    Yeah, I’ve been looking a node.js too. It is quite impressive.

    regards
    Derek

    #1164201
    Greg_M
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    Funny about that, I used to have a VPS at Linode.

    Originally the idea was to have somewhere better for client sites (WordPress), with the added benefit of having somewhere to experiment with Ruby on Rails.

    The Linode Ruby/Rails set up tutorials were pretty good as far as I recall.

    Part of the issue running Rails apps, is you need an app server as well as Apache et al … I did get it working, but from memory there were issues running a PHP stack in parallel with the app server … it all got a bit hard after I discovered the delights of platforms like Heroku. As a server admin I was ordinary (and not very profitable), so eventually moved the client sites, and only use Cloud platforms now.

    I notice the whole thing has gone to another level now, you can now just connect/subscribe to a managed database of choice … use whatever front end you choose … a lot of AngularJS sites seem to be doing this.

    The fact some of these services are offering WordPress installs is a new one too.

    Bitnami has an out of the box install/deploy option for WordPress on AWS.

    Can’t say I miss having a local LAMP stack, Ruby frameworks (and Node stuff to) all have built in local app servers that seem to just work.

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