Home Forums Tell me straight… Your Opinion

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #993249
    Alistair
    Member
    • Total posts: 11

    Hi everyone. I have just created a new web site that lists mortgage brokers by their postcode and ratings. Would like some feedback if possible.

    It’s called Find a Local Mortgage Broker.

    Please try it out and see if you have a local mortgage broker in your area.

    #1190592
    GuestMember
    Member
    • Total posts: 318

    Hi Alistair
    Some good things: clear navigation, concept communicated, responsive. Well done!

    Some possible tweaks:
    Consider obtaining fresh testimonials to make sure the site looks like it’s buzzing (Im getting Jun 2014 for two and Jul 2015 for the other two) – this could act as negative social proof.

    Stock image on Home. Consider something more unique and memorable. A mix of ethnicities would be more inclusive.

    I did wonder whether structuring more obviously for the 2 sides of your marketplace could be better. Take Fees and Charges. Does it read well to brokers and buyers? Obviously, they have very different needs and selling the benefits is different.

    Minor typo on Mortgage Broker Leads: If your [you’re, you are] a mortgage broker and looking for more business…

    Trade: I can mention your platform to a mortgage broker I know in my region if you can help me find someone for my platform! :)

    Hope that helps! Paul

    #1190593
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136

    Hi Alistair,

    Generally a really nicely designed site! Very clean and simple, great!

    Our preliminary comments on the information architecture:

    • Menu items: 8 is too many.
      Reducing the cognitive load will increase people’s ability to maintain attention and get what they need from your site. Cognitive psychology has some interesting topics on this if you’re interested, but it’s generally accepted that 7 is the maximum number of items that should be in a list unless they’re somehow grouped into smaller pieces.
    • By using a textfield placeholder (“postcode or suburb”) and moving the textfield up to sit immediately under the heading, I think you’re more likely to get people not just clicking away when they have to read through the text. Put the text “Enter you postcode to find a local mortgage broker or enter a brokers name to view their profile” underneath in smaller writing if you need to. There’s a lot of repetition in this that could be removed.
    • Spelling mistake: “Enter you postcode” on home page, should be “your”.
    • The content below the fold on “home” and that of “how it works” are serving multiple purposes, and also has some overlap. This could be combined. It seems to be addressing the issues of how to use the site, which could possibly be built into a small paragraph on the core functionality page.

    If you’re interested in a proper appraisal, let us know.

    Julian

    #1190594
    GuestMember
    Member
    • Total posts: 318

    Good advice Julian but just to be sure, Miller’s work on working memory (7 + or – 2) might not be the best example. Few people would try to store this information. They look sequentially for what they need and would typically ignore Contact for example, unless they needed it, as it is almost a given (so is Home and About on many sites). The research demanded the participants repeat back a list. Here, they scan back and forth as many times as they like. No pressure to remember all. Not quite the same thing.

    The advice remains good, and customers want as few menu items as possible, because it’s quicker to see, navigate and find the relevant button. It’s just one of my degrees is in psychology and I see this used a lot, often out of context, as people lend authority and credibility to what they’re saying by appealing to ‘the research’. Just so you know, in case it’s something you regularly mention!

    #1190595
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136
    Paul Peace, post: 223726, member: 54653 wrote:
    Good advice Julian but just to be sure, Miller’s work on working memory (7 + or – 2) might not be the best example. Few people would try to store this information. They look sequentially for what they need and would typically ignore Contact for example, unless they needed it, as it is almost a given (so is Home and About on many sites). The research demanded the participants repeat back a list. Here, they scan back and forth as many times as they like. No pressure to remember all. Not quite the same thing.

    The advice remains good, and customers want as few menu items as possible, because it’s quicker to see, navigate and find the relevant button. It’s just one of my degrees is in psychology and I see this used a lot, often out of context, as people lend authority and credibility to what they’re saying by appealing to ‘the research’. Just so you know, in case it’s something you regularly mention!

    Agreed. I was mostly going from the gut here, truth be told. My gut reaction was that the menus were too much to take in at a glance, and that’s usually not the best thing for navigation. I like two to five “options”, if possible. “KISS” applies here, like with most things.

    Julian

    #1190596
    GuestMember
    Member
    • Total posts: 318

    True. :)

    #1190597
    getcontented.com.au
    Member
    • Total posts: 136

    [USER=4028]@Alistair[/USER] what did you think of our comments? Or did you get busy? :)

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.