Home – New Forums Selling online Your website is not creative unless it sells

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #983768
    Jenny Spring
    Member
    • Total posts: 597
    Up
    0
    ::

    The number one call I get that people need help with is — I have a new website, and I’m not getting enough sales and customers.

    So here is my question for you.

    Why do you think this happens? Misery after a new website is built?

    #1144119
    Greg_M
    Member
    • Total posts: 1,691
    Up
    0
    ::

    I see heaps of examples in this forum of websites not working to generate sales.

    The usual contenders are SEO (in all it’s facets), poor visual design, lousy copy, needs a marketeer … on it goes.

    As a skeptical (possibly cynical) old bloke, with lots of business miles on the clock I often feel they’re just plain crappy products, or services, with low consumer demand, regardless of how you flog them.

    Another common one, is reinventing the wheel, or trying to sell something into an already saturated market, without any differentiating factors.

    The “b” grade end of the SEO and marketing world would starve to death without them though.

    With the exception of existing (profitable) businesses adding a web presence to their mix, I don’t think many do enough research into actual demand before they commit to a site … then blame the site for failure.

    #1144120
    John Romaine
    Participant
    • Total posts: 1,108
    Up
    0
    ::

    1. Most people place 100% emphasis on design instead of conversions
    2. The site owner doesn’t know what they want (purpose of the site)
    3. Nobody tracks anything
    4. Most sites have too much noise
    5. Most people don’t know what they’re doing and are often too stubborn to get help

    #1144121
    makemybabyfunky
    Member
    • Total posts: 4
    Up
    0
    ::

    In my experience, when you are starting out it is very difficult to get your website found I.e. get enough traffic to your site to drive sales. You need to rank on the first page of Google to have any chance, so SEO is very important. It seems that mastering SEO is tricky and very time consuming, and small business owners may not have the time to undertake properly and it is expensive to get a company to do your SEO (and it is hard to find a trustworthy source!). You get a lot of conflicting information about SEO and it is hard to work out where to invest your time and money.

    #1144122
    Adrian Rodriguez
    Member
    • Total posts: 10
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Jenny,

    Often times the reason behind this is not having a saleable product or service to begin with but expecting miracles to happen by just bringing them online. In a nutshell – it’s all about the expectations.

    Another thing that comes into play is how people find your site or the number of visitors you get. Obviously a site can’t bring it’s own visitors in; It has to come from somewhere. SEO makes you rank higher in Searches and Social Media Interaction drives visitors directly to your site, so these are definitely two factors worth considering.

    Of course other factors may sometimes come into play, like not visually pleasing or too hard to navigate (website) or possibly having the wrong kind of content. But as to your question, it probably is all about the expectations that was set at the time the website went live.

    #1144123
    JoshG
    Member
    • Total posts: 110
    Up
    0
    ::
    makemybabyfunky, post: 165081 wrote:
    In my experience, when you are starting out it is very difficult to get your website found I.e. get enough traffic to your site to drive sales. You need to rank on the first page of Google to have any chance, so SEO is very important. It seems that mastering SEO is tricky and very time consuming, and small business owners may not have the time to undertake properly and it is expensive to get a company to do your SEO (and it is hard to find a trustworthy source!). You get a lot of conflicting information about SEO and it is hard to work out where to invest your time and money.

    Unfortunately you’ve hit the nail on the head with regards to the internet marketing industry. Too many snake oil salespeople have caused it to have a seriously bad reputation and it’s going to take a long time to un-do the damage.

    On topic, I think a big part of the reason for lack of sales on many websites is, as others have said, too many people think the process is:

    1) come up with an idea;
    2) create the website;
    3) get rich.

    Having a website is just like having a shop – you have to get people into it, make sure you’re putting them in the mood to buy and be able to convince them that you can be trusted and the product is required in their house/business. And that’s just scraping the surface!

    #1144124
    websitedesigner
    Member
    • Total posts: 917
    Up
    0
    ::

    Because business owners don’t want to do the work required to make a great website that has a decent amount of traffic and a decent system of converting them.

    It’s a hell of a lot of work not just something you pay once for. 99% of business owners don’t have the desire to put in the work it’s as simple as that.

    #1144125
    John Romaine
    Participant
    • Total posts: 1,108
    Up
    0
    ::

    Amen brother. Amen.

    #1144126
    JohnW
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,642
    Up
    0
    ::

    Hi Jenny,
    Let’s talk about business owners who want a website.

    The problem is that they don’t know how to manage the process.

    The starting point is usually, “I like the look of this website” or “I like the (irrelevant) ‘flash-bang’ things that this website does”.

    It seems that as soon as people are asked for comments or direction about website design, a hidden animal emerges from the cupboard and all manner of extraneous and irrelevant factors suddenly become “important”.

    I’ve spent part of today preparing a Website Design Brief for a client. This was for a company in the medical service industry with a number of clinics around Australia.

    Seems the first “like the look of” suggestions came from the office staff and was for a women’s clothing online shop.

    The next suggestions were from management and were at least for a relevant type of service website but one whose colour theme was based around brown, white and green. It looked like the designer had no pre-existing logo colours to comply with.

    My client has existing logo colours based on blue, green, gold and white. Not exactly a good fit with a “I like this brown, white and green scheme”.

    The next suggestion was “we like the slider graphic on this site”.

    IMHO, all the “off-the-shelf” design templates that are so widely available are responsible for killing so many websites and sliders must be one of the most misused and detrimental effects being promulgated.

    I’m not anti-sliders. However, its seems most people have no idea when to use them.

    I spend a lot of time auditing website problems. Most of the sites I review that include a slider on the Home page show an average time on Home page that is less than it takes the slider to run through its sequence.

    In other words, the slider is getting in the way, not contributing to the communications process.

    Jenny, As you so rightly say, if your client site’s primary objective is to deliver sales leads and it doesn’t, it has been a waste of time and money.

    Here are some of the questions I run clients through when developing a site design brief:

    1. What are the objectives of the website?
    2. Who do you want to communicate with?
    3. What are your priority products or services that you want to develop?
    4. What information do prospective customers need as they progress through the purchasing process?
    5. How will they search for this info as they progress through the purchasing process?
    6. How do I need to structure my site to accommodate these search methods?

    There are too many to list here.

    Let me finish my “rant” by referring to the “Home page design fixation”.

    By that, I mean business owners wants to start with the Home page design and they seem to assume that all site visitors hit the site at the Home page.

    Wrong!

    If you evolve into say, a 100 page website, you may find that only 20% of visitors will land on your site’s Home page.

    A crucial question should be, “who is likely to land on your Home page”?

    Are they likely to be existing clients or potential clients?

    You need to design a site so that you provide information for the people who visit its pages – the Home page is just another page.

    After 18+ years in the industry I still find this approach is almost NEVER implemented.
    Regs,
    JohnW

    #1144127
    John Debrincat
    Member
    • Total posts: 963
    Up
    0
    ::
    JohnW, post: 165483 wrote:
    By that, I mean business owners wants to start with the Home page design and they seem to assume that all site visitors hit the site at the Home page.

    Wrong!

    If you evolve into say, a 100 page website, you may find that only 20% of visitors will land on your site’s Home page.

    A crucial question should be, “who is likely to land on your Home page”?

    Are they likely to be existing clients or potential clients?

    Regs,
    JohnW

    John this is such an important issue and so misunderstood. Well done for raising it. For a substantial online stores with say 20 – 30 categories and maybe 1,000 products there are actually over 1,100+ pages found on search engines. The power of the internet and search is that any and all of those pages may become a landing page (entry) for a visitor.

    We often have customers call and say that they have an SEO “Expert” working on the site. The majority of the time all they concentrate on is the home page. But what is going to help people to buy from your site is finding that product directly by search and then going directly to that product.

    Having a top Google organic result on your homepage for some obscure keyword or phrase is not going to make you a millionaire.

    If someone is searching for a product that you sell and your product page turns up first (or high) in search then that could lead to a conversion. So that takes us back to the core of being successful online – CONTENT.

    By way of an example one of our successful customers sells parts for whitegoods. They have 1,000’s of parts (i.e. pages). Although their homepage ranks well for a generic search like “whitegoods spare parts” those style of keywords only make up a tiny percentage of converting terms. The vast majority are for part names like “LG dryer model xyz fan belt”. These get excellent results and almost always result in a sale.

    John

    #1144128
    JohnW
    Member
    • Total posts: 2,642
    Up
    0
    ::
    John Debrincat, post: 165503 wrote:
    We often have customers call and say that they have an SEO “Expert” working on the site. The majority of the time all they concentrate on is the home page.

    Having a top Google organic result on your homepage for some obscure keyword or phrase is not going to make you a millionaire.

    If someone is searching for a product that you sell and your product page turns up first (or high) in search then that could lead to a conversion. So that takes us back to the core of being successful online – CONTENT.

    By way of an example one of our successful customers sells parts for whitegoods. They have 1,000’s of parts (i.e. pages). Although their homepage ranks well for a generic search like “whitegoods spare parts” those style of keywords only make up a tiny percentage of converting terms. The vast majority are for part names like “LG dryer model xyz fan belt”. These get excellent results and almost always result in a sale.
    Hi John,
    I find Shopping Carts sites have the biggest problem with these issues.

    If a 20-30 category, 1,000 product cart site is SE optimised you can expect very few visitors ever go to its Home page.

    I was recently asked to audit a similar sized product catalogue site – it wanted people to phone them about ordering products. Their phone number was only listed on the Home page and yes, only 5% of visitors went to the site’s Home page.

    If a shopping cart with these attributes only links to “specials” on its Home page, guess what sales they will have.

    I love all the “consultants” and “shopping cart software” developers who fixate on either the ordering process or SEO without any understanding of essential Internet marketing issues like these, they are the source of my business.
    Regs,
    JohnW

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.