Marketing

8 lessons I’ve learnt after a week spent on ClubHouse

- February 7, 2021 3 MIN READ

1: Bright shining object – if you already feel you suck with your current marketing, adding another to your marketing toolbox is not going to make your life any easier. Clubhouse can be addictive – listening to interesting people, connecting and learning. But if it means you are not getting done what you need to get done, maybe it is not the right time for you.

2: No marketing plan or clear understanding your audience – our primary goal in business is to market our business. A well thought out plan is essential for growth and sales. If you don’t really understand your audience, you will spend a lot of time on Clubhouse in the wrong rooms. AND if your time on Clubhouse is not adding value to your overall marketing, then you are really procrastinating.

3: Get your bio right – tell a story. Your bio is the first thing people see when they are working out whether to follow you or invite you to collaborate. The first three lines are important – include things you are proud of, things you’ve accomplished and what you do. Try not to be too salesy.

4: Pick the right rooms – there are SO many rooms to choose from. Go back to your marketing plan, the understanding of your audience so you are hanging in the rooms that will add value to your learning and connect you with people who align with you.

5: Actively participate – Listen, talk and ask. It is easy to sit quietly and not take part in the conversation but you have an incredible op to ask questions of some incredible minds who are giving their time for free. Tap into that. I was in a room this morning with some incredible woman and someone said something I didn’t agree with. I put my hand up to talk … and the nerves started. I wanted to leave. I didn’t. I said my piece and made a couple of great connections to do some work with. If Clubhouse does fit with your strategy, make time in your diary to pop into rooms every day to build those relationships.

6: It’s not about sales – If you think it is a space to flog your wares, it isn’t. Like Adam Grant’s book Give & Take, give, give, give before you take. Great profile building comes from building relationships and know, like and trust. The sales will come. But like all profile building, it takes time and a degree of patience.

7: Don’t succumb to FOMO – watching people scramble for invites was like being at the beach watching seagulls fighting for hot chips. It’s a great marketing ploy. You are NOT going to miss out. All social platforms start with a bang – and if the developers do the right thing, it will be here to stay and you can still jump and make it work for you. Did you know Gmail was invite only when it launched? It is still a great comms tool. When I joined Facebook, it had been around for years but with time, strategy, persistence and consistency, it is one of the most valuable social channels for me.

8: Great ops to collaborate and co present – who has an aligned skill with you? Reach out and co-moderate a room, start conversations, give your insights and wisdom and spread the love. Who knows where these collaborations will lead to?

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