Dirk Steller

Founder and MD of Seed Space

Dad: Jost Steller

My dad, Jost said: “Never forget the importance of hard work and one day you will thank me for these skills and experience.”

Growing up as part of a farming and business-oriented family, there was never a shortage of work to do.  Whether it was driving tractors, pruning trees, fixing fences or renovating houses I was expected to make a constant contribution to the family businesses.

I must have complained a lot because I remember often being told by my father, “One day you will thank me for these skills and experience”. At the time I thought it was a good joke.

However, looking back I very much value the work ethic, the technical skills, the ability to work in a diverse team and the comradery and satisfaction that comes with successfully completing a job together and I do thank him very much for helping me become who I am today.

Geoff Pocock

Exec director of Osteopore Ltd

Dad: Dr. Derek Pocock

My father never saw himself as a commercially astute man.  He was a doctor, who as a forensic pathologist spent his career working within the public service rather than private practice.

He was, however, a highly-regarded philatelist, and would always respond, when asked by myself or my brother often as to what his collection was worth, reply with: “It’s worth what someone else is prepared to pay for it”.

After the past 20 years in corporate finance and commercialisation, working with startups and other early stage tech companies, this phrase remains the most fundamental advice I have ever received on valuation.

It doesn’t matter what your projections and discounted cash flows say your value is. It doesn’t matter what another company was bought or sold for.

Value is, at its heart, always a discussion and negotiation between a buyer and a seller, a transaction between an investor and an investee.

You might think something is worth $100 a share, but unless someone else is prepared to transact at that value, that “valuation” has no relationship to reality.

 

Nir Gabay

Managing director of Elsight

Dad: Solomon Gabay

My father always taught me about the importance of fairness and integrity in your everyday interactions.

Among the many lessons that he taught me over the years was that the most important thing in business is to act with the utmost integrity in all dealings and interactions, and to understand that there are no shortcuts.

He used to tell us that the path to success is to therefore ‘walk the talk’, as a hard work ethic will take you far. That always inspired me and was a key lesson that I’ve tried to instil in my team.

From day one at Elsight, I have always looked to apply these lessons and see them as the cornerstone behind our company’s vision for success.

 

Yanir Yakutiel

CEO and founder of Lumi

I’ll never forget my father telling me this: he said to me that you always have to think about the long term and prioritise building strong relationships with people.

“Help anyone whenever you can. Because a) it’s the right thing to do and b) life is a whole lot easier when you have a lot of people who owe you favours.”

It’s this attitude which inspired me to think more strategically about things, especially in the long run. This piece of advice has served me well with my businesses, and I’m proud of how fast we’ve grown at Lumi.

 

Exec director of Osteopore Ltd

Dad: Dr. Derek Pocock

My father never saw himself as a commercially astute man.  He was a doctor, who as a forensic pathologist spent his career working within the public service rather than private practice.

He was, however, a highly-regarded philatelist, and would always respond, when asked by myself or my brother often as to what his collection was worth, reply with: “It’s worth what someone else is prepared to pay for it”.

After the past 20 years in corporate finance and commercialisation, working with startups and other early stage tech companies, this phrase remains the most fundamental advice I have ever received on valuation.

It doesn’t matter what your projections and discounted cash flows say your value is. It doesn’t matter what another company was bought or sold for.

Value is, at its heart, always a discussion and negotiation between a buyer and a seller, a transaction between an investor and an investee.

You might think something is worth $100 a share, but unless someone else is prepared to transact at that value, that “valuation” has no relationship to reality.

 

Nir Gabay

Managing director of Elsight

Dad: Solomon Gabay

My father always taught me about the importance of fairness and integrity in your everyday interactions.

Among the many lessons that he taught me over the years was that the most important thing in business is to act with the utmost integrity in all dealings and interactions, and to understand that there are no shortcuts.

He used to tell us that the path to success is to therefore ‘walk the talk’, as a hard work ethic will take you far. That always inspired me and was a key lesson that I’ve tried to instil in my team.

From day one at Elsight, I have always looked to apply these lessons and see them as the cornerstone behind our company’s vision for success.

 

Yanir Yakutiel

CEO and founder of Lumi

I’ll never forget my father telling me this: he said to me that you always have to think about the long term and prioritise building strong relationships with people.

“Help anyone whenever you can. Because a) it’s the right thing to do and b) life is a whole lot easier when you have a lot of people who owe you favours.”

It’s this attitude which inspired me to think more strategically about things, especially in the long run. This piece of advice has served me well with my businesses, and I’m proud of how fast we’ve grown at Lumi.