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Starting / Working from home

The psychology of working from home

For most of us, going solo means waving goodbye to rush hour and saying hello to working from home.

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I have been officially working from home, for myself, for 8 months, 3 weeks and 2 days. Here’s what I’ve learnt so far…

    • Working from home is brilliant – there’s no other word for it. I can sleep in, take a long shower, read the paper, have a cup of tea and still be at my desk by 9am. Traffic is evil. It should (and can) be avoided.
    • I have trouble describing myself as ‘employed.’  Working like this is too enjoyable to be defined by a word that makes me so tense.
    • I’m not sure at what point ‘unemployed’ became ‘self-employed’ but it did, and I’m grateful.
    • Midday TV does not pose a threat to productivity. Cleaning the bathroom is both more enjoyable and more productive.
    • Networking is not as calculating as it sounds. It’s really just a lot of coffee and chatting in various locations around the city. Or maybe I’m doing it wrong?

Want more articles like this? Check out the working from home section.

  • Web surfing is both justifiable as a productive work activity and an excellent work-avoidance strategy.
  • Soloism is not for those who like routine. Flexibility is king, sundry royalty and all the little minions.
  • It helps if you live rent-free, with access to someone else’s computer, ISP and telephone account. Alas, all good things must come to an end.
  • In order to sound both professional and capable it helps if, when asked where you work, you don’t answer with “Well, I kind of don’t…Well, I do, but I’m sort of…Actually I do a bit of…”
  • There’s a little voice in my head that whispers that a life of sleeping in, working the hours that I choose, meeting interesting people and getting paid for it can’t last. It might be right, but there’s another little voice that keeps telling the first one to get lost, and that helps.

Ellen Jackson

from Potential Psychology is a consultant business psychologist, coach, blogger and author. She is passionate about using the science of psychology to help other thrive and prosper at work and at home. Connect with Ellen on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.

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