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Productivity / Innovation

Making money offering work experience

Interested in making more money and doing less work? Why not get someone to do your job for you, and pay you for that privilege. Does this sound too good to be true? Read on to find out more about making money offering work experience.

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On a recent holiday in New Zealand, my family and I visited a town in the South Island called Akaroa. It is home to an unlikely entrepreneur: the postie.

He operates the Eastern Bays Scenic Mail Run. You can join the postie on his four and a half hour circuit, whizzing along secluded unpaved roads, visiting hideaways and enjoying breathtaking scenery for the $45.

The Eastern Bays Scenic Mail Run is listed as a must do in many of New Zealand’s adventure travel books. Such a simple, innovative and entrepreneurial idea: the postie enjoys some company on his run, has a spare set of hands to help him to do his job and the opportunity to earn additional income.

Does your business lend itself to an additional income opportunity that you may not have yet considered? Are people interested enough in what you do that they will pay to spend the day with you? Are there potential customers who want hands on work experience doing what you do? Is there something unique that your business has to offer, that people want to be a part of?

"Are people interested enough in what you do that they will pay to spend the day with you? "

    Want more articles like this? Check out the innovation section.

  • A florist could offer classes in decorative floral arrangements and then on sell the finished product.
  • A horticulturalist could offer lessons in creating a vegetable garden, while getting the students to work in his garden.
  • A fabric designer could offer screen printing classes, printing the fabric she requires for the next batch of clothes.

Then there are make up artists, photographers, craftspeople… all have jobs others find fascinating.

A word of caution: you may be able to earn extra income, but you should not lose focus on your core business. I suggest, too, you guard your businesses secrets or competitive edge.

Personally, I support voluntary mentoring, offer work experience and partake annually in my alumni, Griffith University’s Mentoring Programme; however people place higher value on a product or service if they have to pay for it.

Sometimes as adults we are reluctant to partake in work experience, but may be more than happy to pay for the same opportunity.

What do you think? Is there an opportunity for you to make money by getting someone to do your job for you, and to pay you for that privilege?

Heather Smith

is a Chartered Certified Accountant & Xero Accounting Advisor specialising in moving businesses to the cloud, improving productivity and profits. She's written six books including Xero for Dummies & Learn Small Business Start-Up in 7 Days.

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