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Productivity / Performance

The 15-minute end-of-year report

As we near the end of the year, how would you like a performance end-of-year report to turn up on your desk? Would you devour it or get the dog to eat it? Here’s a way to produce one quickly and effectively that can help you prepare for the year ahead.

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For me, one of the many joys of going it alone is not having anyone looking over my shoulder.  And I’ve been flying solo long enough to know therein lies a problem.

We need a bit of over-the-shoulder peering every now and then to help keep our performance up to scratch, even if it comes from our own perspective. In my solo coaching business, I hold people accountable for their actions, which helps them to become keen self-assessors.

For the next 15 minutes, please allow me to be your coach.

What follows are five questions to help you construct a mini end-of-year report. Give it a go and see how you fare:

1. How have things run for you this year?

With a maximum score of 10, rate your:

  • Satisfaction with the strength of client relationships
  • Happiness with the flow of ideal clients
  • Skill at communicating with others
  • Capacity to handle pressure and overwhelm
  • Ability to stay focused on priorities

2. What have been your emotive milestones?

  • What are you happiest about?
  • What are you most excited about?
  • What are you proudest of?

Want more articles like this? Check out the performance section.

"We need a bit of over-the-shoulder peering every now and then to help keep our performance up to scratch, even if it comes from our own perspective."

3. What areas need improvement?

List five aspects of your work that you’d like to bolster in the year ahead.

4. Aren’t we forgetting something?

Now do the same for your life. (Didn’t see that coming, did you?)

5. Who would benefit from reading your end-of-year report?

Take a moment to consider who deserves to hear about how your year has gone and tee up a time to talk it over. It’s called sharing, and it’s that time of year!

I’ll post my answers to the second question in the comments. Why not do the same?

Robert Gerrish

is the founder of Flying Solo and helps soloists stay upbeat and energised. He’s recently published The 1-Minute Commute, is a presenter and facilitator and works one-on-one with those needing a refresh. Find out more about his skills and services and his Olympus Trip 35 camera side hustle or connect on LinkedIn.

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